How to cook beef cheeks

An extremely underrated cut that automatically puts people off as one wonders how to cook it. This superb cut simply needs time… lots of time! Follow our basic rules of how to cook beef cheeks and discover something new.

What is beef cheeks?

Well, as the name suggests beef cheeks are taken from the facial muscle. Often overlooked as a more common cut, it has a tough reputation. It is a tough working muscle which makes it very tough, but this all becomes very tender with time. It simply pulls apart.

Beef cheeks contain a large amount of connective tissue known as collagen. Over time this collagen breaks down and becomes slightly gelatinous, producing a rich, melt-in-your-mouth texture. It’s when you braise them down slowly that you are rewarded with their full flavour which is guaranteed to knock your socks off.

How to cook beef cheeks

The beauty of this cut is that you can basically do whatever you want with it — as long as it’s submerged in liquid and given ample time to work its magic.

With a texture similar to lamb shanks, beef cheeks work well in a variety of dishes, from stews, casseroles to curries, or served simply on their own with a side of creamy mash. You can also use beef cheeks in lieu of short ribs or other beef stew cuts.

Before cooking, make sure any excess fat or sinew around the beef is removed. Although the fibres in the meat will break down over time, the sinew will remain tough and unpleasant, so it’s best to cut off as much of this as possible. Purchase with us and we do this for you.

Beef cheeks are generally also big in size, so we’d recommend one beef cheek per person. It can be anything from 300 – 500g.

Click here to purchase grass fed free range beef cheeks.

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